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Strong A-level results at St Swithun’s School


U6 girls at St Swithun’s have again earned successful A-level results, amassing a strong crop of A* grades. Over 40% of girls achieved at least one A*, with over a fifth of the year group earning two or more A* grades, and overall 88% of entries were graded A* to B. Notably, A-level grades remained high in this first year of the newly-reformed A-level courses in eight subject areas, which accounted for more than half of all A levels taken at St Swithun’s.

In individual subject areas 50% or more of papers in Greek, history of art, Latin, physics, politics and food technology were graded A*, and a third or more of entries in English literature, mathematics, and religious studies also achieved A*. In 10 subjects 100% of candidates earned A* to B grades, including in all five languages offered: French, German, Spanish, Latin and Greek.

Additionally, a record number of girls, nearly one-third of the year group, took the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ), which is equivalent to half an A level and held in high esteem by universities for the skills of self-directed, independent study that it cultivates. They achieved 100% A* to B grades, with 55% A* and 75% A* and A.

When data from baseline testing is taken into account, impressively three quarters of girls earned higher grades across their subjects than predicted, with over half of all A-level grades one grade or more above forecast.

This year’s leavers have earned places at a number of universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, Birmingham, Bristol, Durham, Edinburgh, Exeter, KCL, Manchester, Newcastle, UCL and Warwick to study a diverse range of degree subjects, including archaeology and anthropology, biology, Classics, English literature, geography, history, history of art, international relations, law, medicine, modern languages, natural sciences, philosophy, physics and veterinary science.

The headmistress, Jane Gandee, commented, “We are delighted for this year’s leavers and proud of how so many of them exceeded expectations. Fittingly, they have achieved highly across the A-level curriculum, and the fact that they have done so as the first year group affected by the changes to A levels shows their capacity for hard work, determination and resilience, as well as the skill of our dedicated, able teachers. My colleagues and I wish them every success as they progress from school to the next stages of their lives and education.”

Published: September 4 2017

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